BT Arise II - шаблон joomla Продвижение

PRESS RELEASE: SUPPORT YOUTH TO COMBAT SUBSTANCE ABUSE

26 June 2017 

Every year 26 June is commemorated as International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking. This year the SA Federation for Mental Health wants to draw specific focus to the issue of youth and substance abuse. Substance abuse often affects people during the years when they should be completing school or finding employment, and the entrapment of youth in drug and alcohol abuse, as opposed to engagement in legitimate employment and educational opportunities, poses distinct barriers to the development of individuals and communities.

Substance abuse among youth has severe effects on our communities and families, and has many potential physical and mental health effects for the users, such as increased risk of injury and death due to either violence or accidents; increased probability of engaging in sexual behaviour with high risk of teen pregnancy and transmittable diseases; and increased risk for suicidal behaviour and psychosocial disorders. Abuse of different substances is furthermore also often the reason for declining grades, high absenteeism and school dropouts as well as involvement in crime and gang-related activities.

Substance abuse can be common among people suffering from mental health conditions. People experiencing anxiety, depression, or other mental illnesses often turn to drugs or alcohol to find temporary comfort. These substances are also sometimes used as a coping mechanism for those enduring a great deal of stress or hardship, such as experiencing troubles at home or at school, or losing a loved one.

Using drugs or alcohol to deal with difficult feelings or symptoms of mental illness is sometimes called ‘self-medication.’ But it can make existing mental health problems worse. Studies have for example shown that people who consume high amounts of alcohol are vulnerable to higher levels of mental ill health.

According to reports published in the Journal of the American Medical Association:

  • Roughly 50 percent of individuals with severe mental disorders are affected by substance abuse
  • 37 percent of alcohol abusers and 53 percent of drug abusers also have at least one serious mental illness
  • Of all people diagnosed as mentally ill, 29 percent abuse either alcohol or drugs

It is vitally important that we educate our youth about the dangers of drugs and alcohol abuse, and that we provide them with the emotional and they need so that they do not develop the need to turn to substance use for comfort. It is also essential that parents, teachers and the youth themselves are educated about the signs and symptoms of substance abuse, so that they can identify it early on and get the affected person help as soon as possible.

SAFMH calls on all sectors of society to prioritise the support, education and protection of our youth against substance abuse, and to work together to safeguard their physical and mental health.

Signs of substance abuse -  

Behavioural changes:

  • Drop in attendance and performance at work or school
  • Frequently getting into trouble (fights, accidents, illegal activities)
  • Using substances in dangerous situations such as while driving or operating a machine
  • Engaging in secretive or suspicious behaviour
  • Changes in eating or sleeping patterns
  • Changes in personality or attitude
  • Sudden mood swings, irritability, or angry outbursts
  • Periods of unusual hyperactivity, agitation, or giddiness
  • Lacking motivation
  • Appearing fearful, anxious, or paranoid, with no reason

Physical changes:

  • Bloodshot eyes and abnormally sized pupils
  • Sudden weight loss or weight gain
  • Deterioration of physical appearance
  • Unusual smells on breath, body, or clothing
  • Tremors, slurred speech, or impaired coordination

Social changes:

  • Sudden change in friends, favourite hangouts, and hobbies
  • Legal problems related to substance use
  • Unexplained need for money or financial problems
  • Using substances even though it causes problems in relationships

FOR ENQUIRIES INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Marthé Kotze

Programme Manager: Information & Awareness

SA Federation for Mental Health

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

PRESS RELEASE: TALKING ABOUT YOUTH DEPRESSION

WORLD HEALTH DAY 2017 

Every year the 7th of April is commemorated as World Health Day, to mark the anniversary of the founding of the World Health Organization. This year the theme selected by the WHO is Depression: Let’s Talk.

Globally it is estimated that 300 million people of all ages experience depression, and depression is currently the leading cause of disability worldwide. It is therefore crucial that people are educated about depression, and that all sectors of society are encouraged to speak openly and honestly about their experiences and struggles. Depression can affect anyone regardless of age, race, gender or socioeconomic status. The disorder can greatly impact a person’s ability to carry out even the simplest everyday tasks, with sometimes devastating consequences for relationships with family and friends as well as the ability to function at school or work.

Although all aspects of society may be affected by depression, the South African Federation for Mental Health is appealing to Government, teachers, parents, social workers, and all members of society to place specific emphasis on the mental health of South African youth.  

The 2008 National Youth at Risk Survey which focused on children and adolescents between grade 8 and 11 found that one in four youth (24.7%) reported feeling sad or hopeless, and just under 18% had made at least one suicide attempt. Only 37.2% of youth who reported feelings of sadness had sought treatment from a counsellor or doctor.  World-wide suicide is now listed as the second leading cause of death among 15-29-year olds according to the WHO. Depression is associated with increased risks of substance abuse, unemployment, early pregnancy, and educational underachievement. It is crucial that young people experiencing depression feel safe and comfortable to open up about their struggles, and to seek the correct help and treatment they need.

Research has shown that there are a number of factors that make a person more likely to develop depression, these include environmental factors such as adverse childhood experiences like abuse or poverty, stressful life events such as the loss of a job, death of a loved one or exposure to physical violence. There is also a genetic and physiological component as first degree relatives of someone with major depressive disorder are two to four times more likely to develop the disorder. Depression often remains largely underreported by teens with studies finding that it often takes several years before depressed adolescents and children receive appropriate treatment. This treatment gap is in part due to stigma and fear of discrimination.

On World Health Day SAFMH calls on all South Africans to begin talking openly about depression, and to thereby combat the stigma and misinformation surrounding mental health. Young people struggling with feelings of depression, or any other mental health problems, are encouraged to seek professional help so that they can access the correct forms of treatment.

 

Symptoms of Depression to look out for:

•        Sad, low, or irritable mood or feeling nothing

•        Decreased interest or pleasure in activities

•        Change in appetite or weight

•        Sleeping more or less than usual

•        Feeling restless or slowed down

•        Fatigue or loss of energy

•        Feelings of guilt or worthlessness

•        Decreased concentration

•        Sense of hopelessness

•        Substance abuse

•        Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide

FOR ENQUIRIES INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Marthé Viljoen

Programme Manager: Information & Awareness

SA Federation for Mental Health

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

PRESS RELEASE: ENSURING RIGHT TO EMPLOYMENT FOR PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY SHOULD REMAIN A PRIORITY

31 March 2017

Every year March is commemorated as Intellectual Disability Awareness Month, and this year the South African Federation for Mental Health focused on creating awareness around the right that persons with intellectual disabilities have to access employment opportunities. As the month draws to an end, SAFMH would like to call on Government, partners, mental health care users and the public to continue working to ensure that the rights of persons with intellectual disability are protected and upheld.

The right of persons with disabilities to access employment opportunities is enshrined in various pieces of national and international legislation, and it is our collective responsibility to empower and assist persons with intellectual disability to access these rights.   

SAFMH would like to encourage persons with intellectual disabilities and prospective employers to make use of the SAFMH Right to Employment video materials and other informational resources, and to look for ways in which our workplaces and economy can become more inclusive and accessible.  

The DVD and videos are divided into two sections:

Section 1 is focused on persons with mental disabilities who want to find employment. The video includes information such as practical tips on how to create a CV, how to prepare for a job interview, what reasonable accommodation is and what labour laws exist in South Africa that protect the rights of persons with disabilities.

Section 1 for employees can be accessed here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GREpziXLZoc&feature=youtu.be

Section 2 is focused on prospective employers of persons with mental disabilities. It aims to educate companies and organisations about what is meant by mental disability, what the various benefits are of employing persons with disabilities, what can be expected of companies with regards to reasonable accommodation, and what labour laws protect persons with disabilities in South Africa.

Section 2 for employers can be accessed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=819DHxwRCy0&t=6s

Thank you to all partners and stakeholders for their efforts throughout the month to raise awareness around this important topic. We hope that the hard work will continue to ensure that persons with intellectual disability are given the chance to access all the opportunities that other South Africans enjoy.

FOR INQUIRIES INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Marthé Viljoen

Programme Manager: Information & Awareness 

SA Federation for Mental Health

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

PRESS RELEASE: WORLD BIPOLAR DAY – TELLING THE STORIES OF PEOPLE LIVING WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER  

30 March 2017 

World Bipolar Day is celebrated every year on the 30th of March, the birthday of Vincent Van Gogh, who was posthumously diagnosed as possibly having bipolar disorder.

Bipolar disorder is the 6th leading cause of disability in the world, with an estimated 60 million people worldwide living with the disorder, according to the World Health Organisation. Despite its prevalence, bipolar disorder is still surrounded by stigma and misinformation. The reality is however that despite the severe and often debilitating symptoms, with the correct treatment and support many people with bipolar disorder are able to live functional and healthy lives as part of their communities. In order to fight the stigma surrounding the disorder, and to try and encourage understanding and support, the South African Federation for Mental Health is encouraging persons living with bipolar disorder to share their stories.   

Sifiso Mkhasibe Life Story - Living with Bipolar Mood Disorder

"I am a survivor of Bipolar Mood Disorder type 2. I can remember when I was told that I had this mental condition, I was confused and had no idea what it was and how to manage it. It was all new to me. I remember the doctor telling me that I had to take medication for the rest of my life, and it seemed like a death sentence. I didn’t understand why I had to be on medication and even worse why I was taken away from my family to stay in a hospital, I felt like my freedom was taken away from me. I didn’t see myself as a person who was chronically ill with a mental disorder. I knew I did not belong in hospital, it wasn’t a place for me. And so my journey began.

I remember I was extremely violent and aggressive. And when I was down I was so depressed I tried to kill myself. I didn’t know what to do with this mental disorder that had crippled my life. I was young in my late 20’s, doing well in college and working part time. I was excelling at everything I touched or did. So when I was admitted to hospital, I felt like my life had just ended. I never saw myself living in a lock up ward in hospital. I was always sedated, because of my violent outbursts and my manic and depressive episodes. I had given up on life and any chance of recovering from my mental illness.

My family’s response was that I was bewitched and would never be normal again, unless I went to the traditional healer. My family took me there but I was not healed, so back to hospital I went. I was written off by my family because they didn’t understand what was happening to me or how to help me. It affected them badly, my father even suffered a heart attack from thinking too much about my illness and what went wrong in his life. He blamed himself for my illness and that resulted in the heart attack, but he recovered from it. The rest of my family members kept their distance. I think it was due to a lack of education on how to support me during this time and confusion about my disorder.

Days, weeks, months went by, until I realised enough was enough. I had to take ownership of my bipolar mood disorder. I educated myself about the symptoms I had experienced when I was diagnosed. I went through depressive symptoms which included sadness and hopelessness, with no drive to live. I also went through hypomanic symptoms that included irritability and over excitement, I was also a compulsive spender, and at some point gave away all my belongings to strangers. Once I had learned how to manage my bipolar mood disorder, life started to become clearer, I knew what I had to do and how to do it. I was no longer a victim of my disorder. I stopped defining myself as a person with bipolar mood disorder, now I just say that I had those symptoms when I was diagnosed. I am on medical treatment and I do not present those symptoms any longer.

I am now a healthy and functioning member of society, and I work and study. I live life with a purpose to empower and educate people all over the world about bipolar disorder. I love to take part in outdoor activities. I’ve joined a gym in my community and play for the local soccer team, which consists of friends with bipolar and other mental disorders. I am a highly active South African Mental Health Advocacy Movement (SAMHAM) advocacy leader in my community, helping those who are struggling with their mental condition to understand and manage it, like I have done, and to fight against stigma and discrimination in our society. I work to help others live with dignity and respect, for them to know their rights as mental health care users, and to be responsible for their own mental well-being. 

The treatment I am currently taking has worked well for me over the years. I have come to terms with having to take my medication for the rest of my life, because it brings stability to my life. I am taking Epilim and Seroquel on a daily basis, and been for many years. I have had to make some lifestyle changes in order to manage my disorder, and this has helped me to be healthy.

I am Sifiso Mkhasibe… I am not my illness. My bipolar mood disorder does not define who I am. I used to present symptoms of bipolar disorder but not anymore. I am a survivor of bipolar disorder and I live a normal life. Remember to look after your mental wellbeing." 

By telling their stories in their own words, mental health care users living with bipolar disorder can help to combat the shame and silence that often surrounds mental illness, and they can become empowered through sharing their struggles, experiences and victories with the world. SAFMH encourages anyone living with bipolar disorder to send us their story to help and encourage conversation and education around bipolar disorder. SAFMH would also like to encourage all South Africans to educate themselves about bipolar disorder, in order to create a society that treats mental health care users with dignity and respect.

FOR ENQUIRIES INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Marthé Viljoen

Programme Manager: Information & Awareness 

SA Federation for Mental Health

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

PRESS RELEASE: HUMAN RIGHTS DAY AND WORLD DOWN SYNDROME AWARENESS DAY 2017

PROTECTING THE RIGHT OF PERSONS WITH DOWN SYNDROME AND OTHER INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES TO ACCESS EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES  

On the 21st of March South Africa celebrates Human Rights Day, and worldwide Down syndrome Awareness Day is also commemorated on the same day. This year the South African Federation for Mental Health is focusing on the right that persons with Down syndrome and other intellectual disabilities have to access equal employment opportunities.

There are a number of specific laws in South Africa that are relevant to the right to employment, and these include:

The South African Constitution’s Bill of Rights that specifically prohibits:

  •  inequality and unfair discrimination 

The Employment Equity Act which says that:

  •  employers must remove unfair discrimination from all their policies and practices
  •  and that there must be a diverse workforce broadly representative of our persons (including persons with disabilities)

The Promotion of Equality and Prevention of Unfair Discrimination Act which prohibits:

  • denying a person with a disability to access services and life opportunities

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities which states in Article 27 that:

  •  persons with intellectual disabilities have the right to employment and self-employment opportunities

Based on these legal frameworks, any attempt to deny a person with Down syndrome or other intellectual disability from accessing employment opportunities on an equal basis is a human rights violation.

It is time that our society does away with outdated and stigmatising thinking which believes that persons with intellectual disabilities are unable to contribute or play a meaningful role in their communities. With the right support and training there are people with Down syndrome who would be able to find employment or create opportunities for themselves.

People with Down syndrome should be empowered and assisted to share their skills, insights, and abilities, and to reach a degree of personal independence. On Human Rights Day SAFMH would like to call for all sectors of society including Government, the NGO sector and the private sector, to support persons with Down syndrome and other intellectual disabilities and to ensure that they are afforded the same opportunities as other members of our society and thus actively contribute towards the preservation of their human rights.

 

FOR INQUIRIES INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Marthé Viljoen

Programme Manager: Information & Awareness 

SA Federation for Mental Health

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 

 

PRESS RELEASE: RIGHT TO EMPLOYMENT - SAFMH LAUNCHES RIGHT TO EMPLOYMENT DVD AND VIDEO RESOURCES

16 March 2017

Every year March is commemorated as Intellectual Disability Awareness Month, and this year the South African Federation for Mental Health is focusing on creating awareness around the right that persons with intellectual disabilities have to access employment opportunities.

People with intellectual disability are often marginalised and excluded from various aspects of life due to the perception that they are unable to contribute or play a meaningful role due to their disability. However, with the correct support and training there are people with intellectual disabilities who can be empowered to enter the open labour market.

SAFMH has created an empowerment tool called the Right to Employment DVD, focusing on empowering persons with mental disabilities (including those with intellectual disabilities) to access employment opportunities. Although copies of the DVDS will be distributed to partners, SAFMH has decided to upload the educational videos to YouTube so that they can be accessed by anyone who needs to make use of them.

The DVD and videos are divided into two sections:

Section 1 is focused on persons with mental disabilities who want to find employment. The video includes information such as practical tips on how to create a CV, how to prepare for a job interview, what reasonable accommodation is and what labour laws exist in South Africa that protect the rights of persons with disabilities.

Section 1 for employees can be accessed here:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GREpziXLZoc&feature=youtu.be

Section 2 is focused on prospective employers of persons with mental disabilities. It aims to educate companies and organisations about what is meant by mental disability, what the various benefits are of employing persons with disabilities, what can be expected of companies with regards to reasonable accommodation, and what labour laws protect persons with disabilities in South Africa.

Section 2 for employers can be accessed here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=819DHxwRCy0&t=6s

It is our hope that tools such as the Right to Employment education resources will empower persons with intellectual disabilities to access employment opportunities, as well as help to combat the stigma and discrimination that people with intellectual disability often face.

 

FOR INQUIRIES INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT:

Marthé Viljoen

Programme Manager: Information & Awareness 

SA Federation for Mental Health

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

011 781 1852